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chels:

FAVORITE FOREVER.

Oh wow.

It’s starting, Adam, I think. Adam? It’s starting…

Artistic arrangements of microscopic algae viewed through a microscope.

Diatoms are the best and that’s all there is to it.

The Unsuccessful Self-Treatment of a Case of Writer’s Block 

"I have studied this manuscript very carefully with lemon juice and X-rays and have not detected a single flaw in either design or writing style. I suggest it be published without revision."

The Unsuccessful Self-Treatment of a Case of Writer’s Block

"I have studied this manuscript very carefully with lemon juice and X-rays and have not detected a single flaw in either design or writing style. I suggest it be published without revision."

Moth, 2013, 80 Sewing Button, 2013, 60

artandsciencejournal:

Inside Out: The Art of Vesna Jovanovic

The art of science is in full bloom in the multimedia drawings of Vesna Jovanovic. Jovanovic, a visual artist based in Chicago, creates mysterious and complex images in which human organs, plants, and other organic shapes emerge out of abstract inky pools. Invoking the phenomenon of pareidolia, or the perception of meaningful forms from random stimuli (think Rorschach blots), Jovanovic typically begins her drawings by spilling ink on various 2-D media, including paper and Yupo (a polypropylene-based paper). In response to the shapes created by the ink, she draws in new elements to create a detailed and cohesive composition: cilia-like hairs sprout from shadowy watermarks; intestine-like tubes snake around a rivulet of ink; dividing cells blossom out of blotchy, reddish stains.

Overall, Jovanovic’s work reflects her interest in the broader question of what it means to have a body in an age of dizzying technological advancement and scientific discovery. Her work is a striking montage of the physical and the ephemeral: far from traditional medical illustration, Jovanovic’s compositions are thoughtful and poetic reflections on our relationship with nature and the human form.

Given her background in both visual art and chemistry, Jovanovic’s fascination with the intersection of art and science seems a natural fit. In addition to informing her drawings, her interest in science has tinged other aspects of her work, including her photography and ceramics practices. Vesna Jovanovic is currently completing a residency at the International Museum of Surgical Science in Chicago. To see more of her work, go to her website , and her fascinating blog, Traces.

- Suzanne Hood

They’re working these people like draft horses.
naturalose:

Species in the Rhinochimaera family are known as long-nosed chimaeras. Their unusually long snouts (compared to other chimaeras) have sensory nerves that allow the fish to find food. Also, their first dorsal fin contains a mildly venomous spine that is used defensively. They are found in deep, temperate and tropical waters between 200 to 2,000 m in depth, and can grow to be up to 140 cm (4.5 ft) in length.
Chimaeras (also known as ghost sharks and ratfish) are an order of cartilaginous fish most closely related to sharks, but they have been evolutionarily isolated from them for over 400 million years.
(Info from WP and .gif from video by NOAA’s Okeanos Explorer, July 2013—this is NOT an animation!)

It’s in tiny little type there so I’ll just go ahead and repeat: this is NOT an animation. If you’ve got 2 minutes it’s worth watching the full video.

naturalose:

Species in the Rhinochimaera family are known as long-nosed chimaeras. Their unusually long snouts (compared to other chimaeras) have sensory nerves that allow the fish to find food. Also, their first dorsal fin contains a mildly venomous spine that is used defensively. They are found in deep, temperate and tropical waters between 200 to 2,000 m in depth, and can grow to be up to 140 cm (4.5 ft) in length.

Chimaeras (also known as ghost sharks and ratfish) are an order of cartilaginous fish most closely related to sharks, but they have been evolutionarily isolated from them for over 400 million years.

(Info from WP and .gif from video by NOAA’s Okeanos Explorer, July 2013—this is NOT an animation!)

It’s in tiny little type there so I’ll just go ahead and repeat: this is NOT an animation. If you’ve got 2 minutes it’s worth watching the full video.

(via cranky-old-bastard)

Hey, c’mon, stop that.

(via actegratuit)

gothamknowledge:

Lady Amherst’s Pheasant

Sometimes I just don’t know you nature.

Daaaaamn.

(via liketinyhorses)