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Democracy in action, folks. 
We started with over 1,000 possible names for our Hypothetical Placental Mammal.  From 32 finalists, we’re now down to just 2 contenders, and the battle is getting heated. 
Have you voted yet?

Democracy in action, folks. 

We started with over 1,000 possible names for our Hypothetical Placental Mammal.  From 32 finalists, we’re now down to just 2 contenders, and the battle is getting heated

Have you voted yet?

What’s that?  You like March Madness, but you’d prefer something nerdier, maybe something that involves an ancient mammal of some kind?  No problem! 

What’s that?  You like March Madness, but you’d prefer something nerdier, maybe something that involves an ancient mammal of some kind?  No problem

Help us name this little guy!
amnhnyc:

It’s Tuesday’s peek into the archives: Melting the wax covering from a cactus model, December 1953.  See the model today in the Hall of North American Forests. © AMNH Library/ 323110

"Oh, not much…cleaned the wax off the cactus…why, what did YOU do at work today?"

amnhnyc:

It’s Tuesday’s peek into the archives: Melting the wax covering from a cactus model, December 1953.  See the model today in the Hall of North American Forests. © AMNH Library/ 323110

"Oh, not much…cleaned the wax off the cactus…why, what did YOU do at work today?"

Blind children studying the hippopotamus.
(Another gem from the American Museum of Natural History Library, dated 1914.)

Blind children studying the hippopotamus.

(Another gem from the American Museum of Natural History Library, dated 1914.)

These are from the wonderful Picturing the Museum section on the American Museum of Natural History website.  Lots more goodies there if you like museums, history, museum history, dioramas, or kids looking adorable.

(Image credit: American Museum of Natural History Library)

liquidnight:

Nina Leen
Dr. S.H. Chubb, Osteologist at the American Museum of Natural History, adjusting a wire brace on the skeleton of a small donkey, November 1944
[From the LIFE magazine Photo Archive]

This guy is too perfect.  Look at that mustache.  Look at that vest.

liquidnight:

Nina Leen

Dr. S.H. Chubb, Osteologist at the American Museum of Natural History, adjusting a wire brace on the skeleton of a small donkey, November 1944

[From the LIFE magazine Photo Archive]

This guy is too perfect.  Look at that mustache.  Look at that vest.