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Showing posts tagged charts

Have you guys tried the scales at AMNH that tell you what you’d weigh on various planets? Never (in my experience) gets old.

Have you guys tried the scales at AMNH that tell you what you’d weigh on various planets? Never (in my experience) gets old.

(via ilovecharts)

ilovecharts:

The Dinosaur Pet Guide 
by johnconway, via bradct

Blood spatter analysis.

(In case you haven’t heard, the next episode Radiolab is all about blood.  To prime the pump, I’ll be posting bloody goodies for you this week.)

Wow, OK.  Way to go, pearl mussel. 
(via)

Wow, OK.  Way to go, pearl mussel.

(via)

Crayola Color Chart, 1903-2010.  Apparently the number of colors doubles every 28 years!

Crayola Color Chart, 1903-2010.  Apparently the number of colors doubles every 28 years!

wnyc:

Take a trip inside the magical world of….The Book of Clocks. This guide sits in the control rooms at WNYC and has the standard “clocks” for each show. How long the segments are, where the breaks come, when the network hands off to the local affiliate, etc… Without this, we’d be flying blind. Also makes for great bedtime reading.

-Jody, BL Show

brucesterling:

Could prove useful

brucesterling:

Could prove useful

(via freakyfauna)

I’ve got a real soft spot in my heart for the US Census Bureau, so I was pretty thrilled to discover their Data Visualization Gallery.  Useful info, beautifully presented, often interactive, and just fundamentally nifty. 

From Wired’s Best Scientific Figures of 2012.

Figures contained in scientific reports are a neglected area of the design world. Typically intended for display to academic audiences in the cramped confines of a journal, they tend to be utilitarian and esoteric—yet while looking through hundreds of articles in the course of 2012, certain figures transcended the technical and rose to the level of communication art. They combined visual clarity, information density and insight into some fact of fundamental interest.

Featuring such gems as “Gardening with Fire” and “All the Birds in the World.”