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Showing posts tagged landscapes

awkwardsituationist:

the remote and little known rice terraces of yuanyang county in china’s yunnan province were built by the hani people along the contours of ailao mountain range during the ming dynasty five hundred years ago. the terraces, once planted during the early spring season, are then irrigated with spring water from the forest above, which reflect sunlight to create the images seen here.

photos by jialiang gao, javarman, isabelle chauvel and thierry bornier

(previous posts on the rice terraces of the philippines and vietnam)

Can’t…look…too…beautiful.

awkwardsituationist:

martin harvey photographs huge flocks of flamingos - up to 1.5 million - conforming to the shoreline of lake borgoria in kenya, which they do in order to enclose and feed on the abundant blue green algae which thrive in the lake’s warm alkaline waters.

"despite their apparent large numbers, flamingo are a threatened species due to their very specific feeding and breeding requirements," harvey notes. "as conservationists, we can only try to get people aware of this truly incredible species and hope to put pressure on governments to protect their habitat."  video

Right, so, just to reiterate, THESE ARE FLAMINGOS.

Makes a nice antidote to the amazing, thoughts-of-your-own-mortality-inducing desiccated bird photos that have been making the rounds lately.

natgeofound:

A wave of rock shaped by wind and rain towers above a plain in Western Australia, September 1963. Photograph by Robert B. Goodman, National Geographic

Damn.

natgeofound:

A wave of rock shaped by wind and rain towers above a plain in Western Australia, September 1963. Photograph by Robert B. Goodman, National Geographic

Damn.

atlasobscura:

Dallol -  Ethiopia 

The Hottest place on Earth!

Read more on Atlas Obscura 

staceythinx:

Aerial views of rice fields in Indonesia (Makassar, Sulawesi) from peace-on-earth.org

npr:

panda-moniummm:

The Spotted Lakes of British Columbia
The lake appears to be a normal one during fall, winter, and a small portion of spring; but during the summer, most of the lake becomes evaporated. Dozens upon dozens of crater-like mineral deposits rest at the bottom of the lake and become visible during the warm weather. The mineral deposits span about 25 feet on average and contain many different concentrations of magnesium sulfate, and calcium/sodium phosphates, which gives them a distinct yellow, orange, green, or blue color.

I want to touch that. — tanya b.

npr:

panda-moniummm:

The Spotted Lakes of British Columbia

The lake appears to be a normal one during fall, winter, and a small portion of spring; but during the summer, most of the lake becomes evaporated. Dozens upon dozens of crater-like mineral deposits rest at the bottom of the lake and become visible during the warm weather. The mineral deposits span about 25 feet on average and contain many different concentrations of magnesium sulfate, and calcium/sodium phosphates, which gives them a distinct yellow, orange, green, or blue color.

I want to touch that. — tanya b.

photojojo:

Andre Ermolaev’s photographs of Icelandic lava flows remind us of abstract paintings! 

Aerial Photography of Icelandic Lava Flows

via My Modern Net

Wow.

From Live Science: “Astrophotographer Niccolò Bonfadini took this stunning picture in the Finnish Lapland in the winter of 2011. With the sun rising behind the photographer, the Belt of Venus is the pinkish streak caused by the atmosphere reflecting light from the setting or rising sun — giving the reddish hue.”
Two things:
Astrophotographer is pretty much the the best job title I’ve ever heard.
I know I’m supposed to be looking at the Belt of Venus and everything, but holy crap, those show-pillar things are trees!

From Live Science: “Astrophotographer Niccolò Bonfadini took this stunning picture in the Finnish Lapland in the winter of 2011. With the sun rising behind the photographer, the Belt of Venus is the pinkish streak caused by the atmosphere reflecting light from the setting or rising sun — giving the reddish hue.”

Two things:

  1. Astrophotographer is pretty much the the best job title I’ve ever heard.
  2. I know I’m supposed to be looking at the Belt of Venus and everything, but holy crap, those show-pillar things are trees!

staceythinx:

This red lake in Camargue, France caught photographer Sam Dobson’s attention while driving by. Intrigued by the red color, an effect of unusually high salt content, he documented the surreal scene.

Oh. Oh my goodness.

watershedplus:

Found in San Francisco Bay, these salt evaporation ponds are shallow artificial ponds designed to produce salt from sea water and other brines. Water is drawn out through natural evaporation which allows salt to be harvested. The bright colours of the ponds, ranging from bright green to magenta, are a result of microorganisms that thrive as the salinity levels increase.

Read more at amusingplanet.com via Ice Water blog

Gorgeous.  Landscapes like these are the best part of air travel.

(via makeanx)