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laphamsquarterly:

TERMS OF VENERY
What’s your favorite term of venery? We enjoy of a shrewdness of apes, though a kindle of kittens is always nice to have around the house. 

I never get tired of these.  A drift of hogs!  An exaltation of larks!

laphamsquarterly:

TERMS OF VENERY

What’s your favorite term of venery? We enjoy of a shrewdness of apes, though a kindle of kittens is always nice to have around the house. 

I never get tired of these.  A drift of hogs!  An exaltation of larks!

cmnotes:

“Jabberwocky” from Through the Looking-Glass by Lewis Carroll (1871), trans. to French by Frank L. Warrin (1931) and German by Robert Scott (1872), printed in Gödel, Escher, Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid by Douglas Hofstadter (1979). More translations & other languages here.

The ultimate translation challenge.

(via cmnotes-deactivated20140223)

Merry’s ancestry includes the word murgijaz, a Proto-Germanic word meaning ‘short-lasting,’ and the Proto-Indo-European root mreghu- which simply meant ‘short.’ It is suggested that the connection to pleasure comes from the notion of ‘making time fly’ — that time feels short in a pleasurable state. So within merry, the ideas of enjoyment and evanescence find themselves inextricably linked. To wish someone a ‘Merry Christmas,’ in the very old sense, is to wish them pleasure and to express a hope that they’ll savor that pleasure acutely before it passes.

From the always wonderful Aesthetics of Joy.  A belated Merry Christmas, a premature Happy New Year, and a general Delightful Holidays to you all!

kenopsia

dictionaryofobscuresorrows:

n. the eerie, forlorn atmosphere of a place that’s usually bustling with people but is now abandoned and quiet—a school hallway in the evening, an unlit office on a weekend, vacant fairgrounds—an emotional afterimage that makes it seem not just empty but hyper-empty, with a total population in the negative, who are so conspicuously absent they glow like neon signs.

I have grown very fond of the Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows.  Technically this may not be a real word…but language is constantly evolving, right?  Let’s evolve this sucker into the vernacular.

(via thehouseofspook)