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I remember looking down and seeing purple nail polish on the thumb.
Goose grease mixed with honey, the flesh of a mad dog (salted), the skin or old slough of a serpent, a clod from a swallow’s nest…pull out the feathers from around a live rooster’s anus and apply the anus to the bite wound!
A new episode of Radiolab, all about blood, just for you.
furtho:

George Mayerle’s eye chart featuring characters in English, Chinese, Japanese and Russian, as well as symbols for children or illiterate adults, 1907 (via The Verge)

"Across the bottom, boxes test for color vision, a feature intended especially (according to one advertisement) for those working on railroads and steamboats." Read all about it.

furtho:

George Mayerle’s eye chart featuring characters in English, Chinese, Japanese and Russian, as well as symbols for children or illiterate adults, 1907 (via The Verge)

"Across the bottom, boxes test for color vision, a feature intended especially (according to one advertisement) for those working on railroads and steamboats." Read all about it.

(via dooooq)

An illustrated history of the Heimlich Maneuver. 
Have you ever seen another infographic that features both Cher and C. Everett Coop?  DIDN’T THINK SO.
(Illustrator Larry Buchanan made this to go with our latest short, which features an interview with Dr. Heimlich himself.  Yes, he’s still alive.)

An illustrated history of the Heimlich Maneuver

Have you ever seen another infographic that features both Cher and C. Everett Coop?  DIDN’T THINK SO.

(Illustrator Larry Buchanan made this to go with our latest short, which features an interview with Dr. Heimlich himself.  Yes, he’s still alive.)

I think when you said ‘I can breathe’ was one of the happiest moments of my life.
organicbody:


Tibetan Medical Thangka (source: amnh.org)



Who can tell me more about this?
UPDATE: Here’s a direct link to the image (with zooming capabilities!) courtesy of odditiesoflife.

organicbody:

Tibetan Medical Thangka (source: amnh.org)

Who can tell me more about this?

UPDATE: Here’s a direct link to the image (with zooming capabilities!) courtesy of odditiesoflife.

(via premierepage)

List of human anatomical parts named after people

Bachman’s bundle, Bartholin’s gland, Buck’s fascia and many, many more. (Thanks to Miss Aliza Simons for the tip.)