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National Geographic “Pictures We Love” 

When David Guttenfelder showed us the pictures he shot for “Last Song for Migrating Birds,” a story about how poachers coat tree branches with glue to trap migrating songbirds, I was horrified.
Who would want to eat a sweet little oriole? And how could there possibly be enough meat to make the effort worthwhile? It would be one thing if people need the birds to subsist, but that’s mostly not the case­­. These birds are considered delicacies that people pay a lot of money for.
So when David projected this image of a man with the wing of a blackcap in his lips, I braced myself for a gruesome story about how the man ate the bird live. Instead, David told us, the man was actually a conservationist sucking the sticky sap from the wings of a bird that had been stuck in a glue trap.

National Geographic “Pictures We Love”

When David Guttenfelder showed us the pictures he shot for “Last Song for Migrating Birds,” a story about how poachers coat tree branches with glue to trap migrating songbirds, I was horrified.

Who would want to eat a sweet little oriole? And how could there possibly be enough meat to make the effort worthwhile? It would be one thing if people need the birds to subsist, but that’s mostly not the case­­. These birds are considered delicacies that people pay a lot of money for.

So when David projected this image of a man with the wing of a blackcap in his lips, I braced myself for a gruesome story about how the man ate the bird live. Instead, David told us, the man was actually a conservationist sucking the sticky sap from the wings of a bird that had been stuck in a glue trap.

Paris 1951, by Robert Frank.  If that’s not pure joy, I don’t know what is.
(If you’re in NYC, you can see this photo in person at Danziger Gallery.  I did and it was great.)

Paris 1951, by Robert Frank.  If that’s not pure joy, I don’t know what is.

(If you’re in NYC, you can see this photo in person at Danziger Gallery.  I did and it was great.)

photojojo:

After discovering a batch of negatives that had been left in a thin layer of chemicals for months, Rohn Meijer decided, why not develop them?

To his surprise, the damaged negatives produced stunning images with fascinating coloration. 

Damaged Negatives Produce Strangely Beautiful Photos

via RedditWired

Have I ever mentioned how much I love, love, love, the Nikon Small World Photomicography Competition?  Well I’m mentioning it now.  The 2013 winners have been announced.

explodingtorium:

TImed exposure at Great America amusement park, 1987, photo by Susan Schwartzenberg